What are your marketing priorities for 2010?

The smart money is backing social media…

Money spent on social media-related advertising is already expected to grow significantly this year, and now we also know that the medium is considered the top priority in the digital space according to a survey of senior marketers.

The research, published today in eMarketer, shows that 45.4% of respondents considered social a ‘top priority’ while another 42.2% deemed it ‘important’. That narrowly beat out digital infrastructure for the top spot, with other marketing tactics like search, mobile, and blogger outreach trailing significantly. Source: Social Is the Top Priority for Marketers in 2010 [STATS]

Maybe you’re one of those who knows they need to incorporate social media into their marketing plans, but feels like the train has already left the station. Maybe you don’t even want to admit that you don’t know where to start? No drama! No one can get you up to speed faster than our team! Comment, call or contact us to talk more about where you’re at and where you want to be…

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A Turnaround for the Industry

Newspaper vendor, Paddington, London, February...
Image via Wikipedia

The trends that were remaking the industry before 2008 appear to be picking up where they left off. That means this year is likely to bring rapid growth for spending on ads in new media, resumed growth for spending on television advertising and struggles for print media, particularly newspapers.

According to data from Kantar Media, advertising expenditures for all media for the first half of 2010 increased 5.7 percent from 2009 to about $63.6 billion. Television advertising led the pack in spending because of an increase in demand from the automotive and retail markets, and political advertising.

Spending on advertising in local newspapers showed a significant decline over the last 19 quarters, with a 4.6 percent decrease for the first half of 2010 compared with the same period in 2009, according to data from Kantar Media.

For the first time, advertisers are projected to have spent more on online ads than on newspaper ads in 2010, according to data by eMarketer.

“The bad economy has actually accelerated the shift to digital advertising,” Geoff Ramsey, the chief executive of eMarketer, said in a statement. “Online ads, especially search ads, are increasingly seen by many marketers as a more reliable bet than print ads, which are often difficult to tie to a measurable financial result.”

Go to the source to read the whole article: nytimes.com. Comment or ‘connect with me’ to learn more about how this applies to your organization…

How Many Impressions Does it Really Take?

I came across a mention of this today and thought it appropriate to share.  This is dated advice. Dated from 1885 to be more specific!

Thomas Smith, a London Businessman, wrote a guide called Successful Advertising in 1885. The sayings he used are still being used today and form the foundation for the Theory of Frequency in advertising and marketing.

  1. The first time people look at any given ad, they don’t even see it.
  2. The second time, they don’t notice it.
  3. The third time, they are aware that it is there.
  4. The fourth time, they have a fleeting sense that they’ve seen it somewhere before.
  5. The fifth time, they actually read the ad.
  6. The sixth time they thumb their nose at it.
  7. The seventh time, they start to get a little irritated with it.
  8. The eighth time, they start to think, “Here’s that confounded ad again.”
  9. The ninth time, they start to wonder if they’re missing out on something.
  10. The tenth time, they ask their friends and neighbors if they’ve tried it.
  11. The eleventh time, they wonder how the company is paying for all these ads.
  12. The twelfth time, they start to think that it must be a good product.
  13. The thirteenth time, they start to feel the product has value.
  14. The fourteenth time, they start to remember wanting a product exactly like this for a long time.
  15. The fifteenth time, they start to yearn for it because they can’t afford to buy it.
  16. The sixteenth time, they accept the fact that they will buy it sometime in the future.
  17. The seventeenth time, they make a note to buy the product.
  18. The eighteenth time, they curse their poverty for not allowing them to buy this terrific product.
  19. The nineteenth time, they count their money very carefully.
  20. The twentieth time prospects see the ad, they buy what is offering.

What do you think? How much of this do you think is still applicable?

I was just corresponding with Dana VanDen Heuvel and thanks to Gist and the Gist gadget for Google Apps, I noticed that Dana had just posted some really good content, so I swiped it [with proper attribution of course] and I’m sharing it with you here now. It looks like King Solomon was right — there is nothing new under the sun…

No more 'fan' pages!

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...
Image via CrunchBase

There’s a lot of confusion around Facebook pages, but I doubt this will clear things up…

“Facebook is changing some terminology around how people become fans of its Pages product, a move that could be somewhat confusing but has apparently worked well in the company’s tests.

“People will soon connect with your Brand Pages by clicking ‘Like’ rather than ‘Become a Fan,” the company recently began telling advertising agencies about the change, according to Facebook documents obtained by ClickZ and MediaMemo. ”People already ‘Like’ their friends’ status updates, photos and links everyday. In fact, people click “Like” almost two times more than they click “Become a Fan” everyday,” Facebook’s update days.

The changes are coming “soon” although a timetable has not been finalized and neither have all the details. The new term appears to affect advertising for Pages on Facebook, including both performance ads and brand-focused marketing ads, as you can see from the screenshots below. The company doesn’t say how other instances of “Become a Fan” will be changed, such as the wording for the “Become a Fan” button on Pages themselves.” Source: Facebook Users Will Soon “Like” a Page to Become a Fan, not “Become a Fan”

Will people now call them ‘like’ pages? I try to clear up some of the confusion here

While you were sleeping 3/23/10


Image by marchorowitz via Flickr

If you’re reading the tea leaves, you know that ‘mobile’ is getting more important…

“Speaking at a Mobile Marketing & Advertising event in Las Vegas to coincide with CTIA Wireless 2010, Diana Pouliot – director of mobile advertising at Google – revealed that one-third of all Google searches via the mobile web pertain to some aspect of the searcher’s local environment.

Paul Feng, Google’s mobile-ads group product manager, echoed Pouliot’s sentiments and expounded on Google’s efforts to make the search giant’s advertising reach as local as possible.

Building on the changing ad formats foreshadowed by Google in recent months, Feng suggested further tweaking of those formats in the near future – changes that may even involve new forms of user interaction, including navigation.

According to Mr. Feng: “We think of location as a hugely important signal.”” Source: Google Says Local Intent is Behind One-Third of Mobile Searches : Mobile Marketing Watch – The Pulse Of The Mobile Marketing Community

Still it amazes me how few people are taking advantage of a free service from Google, namely adding your business information to Google Maps. I wrote about it here. Don’t miss my presentation to the Ashwaubenon Business Association today on ‘Practical, tactical social media’! There’s still time — learn more here

While you were sleeping [social media edition] 2/9/2010

Social media has it’s own “while you were sleeping” today…

“Although all is said and done when it comes to football this season, such is not the case for the Super Bowl advertisers.

We’re now entering the entertaining aftermath of the Super Bowl ad showdown, and thanks to social media tracking services like Alterian and Radian6 (Radian6), we can take an early look at advertisers winning big on the web.” Source: Social Media Score Card: How the Super Bowl Advertisers Performed

Apparently, Focus on the Family and their Tim Tebow commercial dominated the space…

Elsewhere, the TED conference starts today…

“The 2010 Technology Entertainment Design conference will be kicking off tomorrow in Long Beach, California, bringing the leading minds of many fields together to talk shop about innovation, change, and what the future holds.

As social media has become a game changer for industries across the board, you can bet the experts at this year’s TED conference will have their sights set on peeling back the hype and getting at the core of what social technology has in store for this year and beyond.” Source: 5 Insightful TED Talks on Social Media

Is Twitter dead?

“AdWeek published the article, The Tweet Hereafter, yesterday and it will probably make no sense to any Marketer who sees any of the Social Media platforms as something more than just another advertising channel.

“Like Second Life, Twitter has become a wasteland for brands. Verizon, a company that spent more than $1 billion on advertising in 2009, has around 5,000 followers — about 0.3 percent the amount that Perez Hilton has. Coca-Cola has 15,000. Apple’s not even on Twitter. And some corporate Twitter accounts suffer from prolonged neglect. Delta Airlines’ Twitter page went from June 17 to Dec. 22 last year without a single update. Delta reps could not be reached for comment.”

So, what’s the message? If you’re looking at trying to find a pure brand building or advertising channel to supplant what you’re doing on television or in print, then Twitter may not be the best substitute. But, if you’re trying to see what kind of conversation there is around your brand, the types of people interested in the industry you serve, the ideas, compliments and complaints that people have about your brand (and your industry), then why would you not be engaged on (or at least monitoring) Twitter? ” Source: Marketers Miss The Mark With Twitter | Six Pixels of Separation – Marketing and Communications Blog – By Mitch Joel at Twist Image

Rock on!

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What are your marketing priorities for 2010?

The smart money is backing social media…

Money spent on social media-related advertising is already expected to grow significantly this year, and now we also know that the medium is considered the top priority in the digital space according to a survey of senior marketers.

The research, published today in eMarketer, shows that 45.4% of respondents considered social a ‘top priority’ while another 42.2% deemed it ‘important’. That narrowly beat out digital infrastructure for the top spot, with other marketing tactics like search, mobile, and blogger outreach trailing significantly. Source: Social Is the Top Priority for Marketers in 2010 [STATS]

Maybe you’re one of those who knows they need to incorporate social media into their marketing plans, but feels like the train has already left the station. Maybe you don’t even want to admit that you don’t know where to start? No drama! No one can get you up to speed faster than our team! Comment, call or contact us to talk more about where you’re at and where you want to be…

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]